ISSN 1712-9559
   Homepage     Essays     Interviews     Reviews     Festival Reports
Categories     Keywords     Past Issues    About Us    Subscription



Keyword : Gilles Deleuze

1.

An analysis of Tarkovsky's Stalker that relates the stylistic elements to Kristin Thompson's notion of excess.

2.

The influence of Nietzche's "power of the false" on Deleuzian temporal aesthetics, as seen in Antonioni's Professione: Reporter.

3.

A theoretical analysis of how the temporal experience is modulated in cinema to accommodate the cognitive possibilities of narrative. The essay relies on the theoretical thoughts of Deleuze and Bergson for its philosophical basis, Paul Ricoeur for the narratology, Bazin for film theory (realism) and then uses the Western genre as its case study.

4.

Part two of Menard's theoretical explication of classical film theory.

5.

This two-part paper uses Orson Welles The Trial (1963) as a model to explicate Brian Henderson's long take theory. Instead of arguing for or against Henderson's critical standpoint, it uses its classification scheme as a basis for a more thorough understanding of the theoretical gap that exists between the two institutional pillars of cinema, the exclusive theories of Sergei Eisenstein and Andre Bazin.

6.

This essay offers a Deleuzian analysis of the great Russian filmmaker Andrei Tarkovsky's montage theory of time-pressure, foregrounded against the historical backdrop of Eisenstein's montage of attractions.

7.

Part two of Menard's unique 'cine-physics'.

8.

Author John Fucile's exploration and research in the Circadian Cinema model explored below has inspired two short digital films which he produced, directed, and co-wrote with Simon Fraser entitled Beat the Blue, which to date has been screened at festivals in New York, Oregon, Colorado, Massachusetts, Florida and California; and his most recent digital short, the wide-screen motion picture Zero.

9.

Totaro explores how certain styles of filmmaking (montage vs. long take style) may be used to activate different cognitive states ('intellect' versus 'emotion').

10.

Can cinema reproduce the full sensorial spectrum, and if so, what would this cinema look like?

11.

Randolph Jordan relies equally on his 'eyes' and 'ears' as he concentrates on the often overlooked juxtaposition of sound and image, a dialectic that is becoming an increasingly important part of Montreal's FCMM Festival International Nouveau Cinéma et Nouveaux Médias.

12.

Part two of David Neo's subtle analysis of Fractal memory images in Sokoruv's Mother and Son.

13.

Gilles Deleuze Meets the Mandelbrot set in this theoretical exploration of the memory images in Sokoruv's modern day Kammerspiel classic Mother and Son.

14.

Offscreen welcomes Randolph Jordan with his first of a two-part festival report on Fantasia 2001.

15.

Why is French philosopher Henri Bergson relevant for today's film theory?

16.

Affliction is a powerful account of domestic male violence and a man trapped within its vicious circle. Nick Nolte is the trapped man Wade Whitehouse, the town's part-time sheriff and all-around handyman, and son to Glen Whitehouse (sublimely played by James Coburn).

17.

In his second book Deleuze tackles temporality in a more direct fashion. Although the book is considerably longer than the first (344 to 250 pages), Deleuze does not propose rigid or neat classifications. The central shift remains from a cinema that defined itself primarily through motion to one that concerned itself more directly with time. The time-image moved beyond motion by freeing itself of the sensory-motor link to a pure optical and sound (tactile) image.

18.

In his second book Deleuze tackles temporality in a more direct fashion. Although the book is considerably longer than the first (344 to 250 pages), Deleuze does not propose rigid or neat classifications. The central shift remains from a cinema that defined itself primarily through motion to one that concerned itself more directly with time. The time-image moved beyond motion by freeing itself of the sensory-motor link to a pure optical and sound (tactile) image.

19.

The following essay will demonstrate how The Puppetmaster is one of the purest Bergsonian films ever made.


Page 1 of 1 pages


 

© Offscreen.com 1997-2014. All rights reserved.
ISSN 1712-9559.